Reform- Saudi Arabia


Today’s Topic: – Law + Human rights + Saudi Arabia + Agenda + Reform


Hi today’s I’m sharing information about the human rights and law related to awareness and updating to the people In Briefly ( sometimes).

The latest ‘reform’ in Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia is ending flogging as a form of punishment, according to a document from the kingdom’s top court.


The decision by the general commission for the Supreme Court, taken sometime this month means the punishment will be replaced by prison sentences, fines or a mixture of both. The decision is an extension of the human rights reforms introduced under the direction of King Salman and the direct supervision of Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman as the document said.


Flogging has been applied to punish a variety of crimes in Saudi Arabia. Without a codified system of law to go with the texts making up sharia, or Islamic law, individual judges have the flexibility to interpret religious texts and come up with their own sentences.


The Saudi Supreme Court said the latest reform was intended to “bring the kingdom into line with international human rights norms against corporal punishment”.


Previously the courts could order the flogging of convicts found guilty of offences ranging from* and breach of the peace to murder.


In future, judges will have to choose between fines and/or jail sentences, or non-custodial alternatives like community service, the court said in a statement seen by AFP. “This reform is a momentous step forward in Saudi Arabia’s human rights agenda, and merely one of many recent reforms in the kingdom,” said Awwad Alawwad, the president of the state-backed Human Rights Commission.

Not many outside the Saudi regime would share Alawwad’s enthusiasm about this ‘reform’.


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11 thoughts on “Reform- Saudi Arabia

  1. Saudi Arabia is an unique and interesting country. It’s laws and courts are a mystery to most Westerners, but nothing to be trifled with. I am glad to see the higher court is trying to bring the laws into alliance with international human rights laws.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Hi Amit, you state that “Not many outside the Saudi regime would share Alawwad’s enthusiasm about this ‘reform’.” Does that mean that most outside of the Saudi regime would think that it should remain as a legitimate punishment? Just curious. Blessings.

    Liked by 4 people

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